Your Rights at the Hospital

Information shared from http://orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/v16n07.shtml.
This post from Orthomolecular focuses on rights to receive intravenous vitamin C in the hospital, but the same principles apply to receive any of the medicines in the covid-19 protocols listed below if hypoxic illness is suspected. If a doctor tries to object to intravenous vitamin C due to fear of kidney stones, print off the information here.

Protocols list:

“Some physicians would stand by and see their patients die rather than use ascorbic acid. Vitamin C should be given to the patient while the doctors ponder the diagnosis.” – Frederick R. Klenner, MD, chest specialist

When faced with hospitalization, the most powerful person in the entire hospital system is the patient. However, in most cases, the system works on the assumption that the patient will not claim that power. If on your way in you signed the hospital’s legal consent form, you can unsign it. You can revoke your permission. Just because somebody has permission to do one thing doesn’t mean that they have the permission to do everything. There’s no such thing as a situation that you cannot reverse. You can change your mind about your own personal healthcare. It concerns your very life. The rights of the patient override the rules of any institution.

If the patient doesn’t know that, or if they’re not conscious, or if they just don’t have the moxie to do it, the next most powerful person is the spouse. The spouse has enormous influence and can do almost as much as the patient. If the patient is incapacitated, the spouse can, and must, do all the more. If there is no spouse present, the next most powerful people in the system are the children of the patient.

When you go to the hospital, bring along a big red pen, and cross out anything that you don’t like in the hospital’s permission form. And before you sign it, add anything you want. Write out “I want intravenous vitamin C, 25 grams per day, until I state otherwise.” And should they say, “We’re not going to admit you,” you reply, “Please put it in writing that you refuse to admit me.” What do you think their lawyers are going to do with that? They have to admit you. It’s a game, and you can win it. But you can’t win it if you don’t know the rules. And basically, they don’t tell you the rules.

This is deadly serious. Medical mistakes are now the third leading cause of death in the US. Yes, medical errors kill over 400,000 Americans every year. That’s 1,100 each day, every day. [5]

There are mistakes of commission and mistakes of omission. Failure to provide intravenous vitamin C is, literally, a grave omission.  Do not allow yourself or your loved ones to be deprived of a simple, easy to prepare and administer IV of vitamin C which is a fundamental support when health is threatened in any serious way.

“If a family member of mine died due to coronavirus infection, after a doctor refused to use intravenous vitamin C, I would challenge his or her treatment in a court of law. I would win.” – Kenneth Walker, MD, surgeon

Vitamin IVs can be arranged in virtually any hospital, anywhere in the world. Attorney and cardiologist Thomas E. Levy’s very relevant presentation is free access. [6,7] http://www.doctoryourself.com/VC.NZ.Sept.2010.pdf and http://orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/v06n26.shtml.

Both the letter and the intent of new USA legislation now make this easier for you.

“The new federal Right to Try Act provides patients suffering from life-threatening diseases or conditions the right to use investigational drugs… It amends the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act to exempt investigational drugs provided to patients who have exhausted approved treatment options and are unable to participate in a clinical trial involving the drug. Advocates of right to try laws have sought to accelerate access to new drugs for terminally ill patients who are running out of options. Arguably, the law does not represent a radical change in this and several other states, however, because in 2016, California had already joined the majority of other states in adopting a law enabling physicians to help terminally ill patients pursue investigational therapies, without fear of Medical Board or state civil or criminal liability. . . The new Right to Try law should give physicians, as well as drug manufacturers, some added comfort about FDA enforcement in these cases.” [8]

Therefore, in regards to intravenous vitamin C or hydroxychloroquine, do not accept stories that “the hospital can’t” or “the doctor can’t” or that “the state won’t allow it.” If you hear any of this malarkey, please send the Orthomolecular Medicine News Service the text of the policy or the law that says so. In the meantime, take the reins and get vitamin C in the veins.”

For more information about the “Right To Try” Act, visit https://righttotry.org/about-right-to-try/

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